Species Profile

Lake Huron Grasshopper

Scientific Name: Trimerotropis huroniana
Taxonomy Group: Arthropods
Range: Ontario
Last COSEWIC Assessment: November 2015
Last COSEWIC Designation: Threatened
SARA Status: No schedule, No Status

Individuals of this species may be protected under Schedule 1 under another name; for more information see Schedule 1, the A-Z Species List, or if applicable, the Related Species table below.


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Quick Links: | Description | Habitat | Biology | Threats | Protection | National Recovery Program | Documents

Image of Lake Huron Grasshopper

Description

Lake Huron Grasshopper is silver-grey to brownish with variable speckles and colours to blend in with its sandy habitat. In flight, the hind wings are exposed to show clear or pale yellow areas at the base, a black band across the middle, and clear or smoky tips. The females (29 to 40 mm) are larger than the males (24 to 30 mm). It is one of a few species endemic to the Laurentian Great Lakes area. (Updated 2016/12/20)

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Distribution and Population

Lake Huron Grasshopper is endemic to the Great Lakes region of Ontario, Wisconsin and Michigan. The species is found exclusively on dunes along the shores of lakes Huron, Michigan and Superior. In Canada, it occurs at 11 dune sites: one location on the east shore of Lake Superior, and seven locations on Lake Huron at the south shore of Manitoulin Island and Great Duck Island. Historically it was also found at Giant’s Tomb Island and Wasaga Beach in Georgian Bay, and at Sauble Beach (Southampton) on the east shore of Lake Huron. The species is now considered extirpated from these sites. (Updated 2016/12/20)

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Habitat

Great Lakes dunes cover a total area of less than 1800 ha in Canada including 492 ha on Lake Huron and 100 ha on Lake Superior. Dunes occur on shorelines where there is plentiful sand in glacial deposits and at river mouths. Exposure to wind and waves is essential to maintain erosion and deposition of sand, and to prevent forest succession. Preferred habitat of Lake Huron Grasshopper is the foredune, a low ridge closest to the lake with open bare sand and scattered grasses. (Updated 2016/12/20)

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Biology

In late summer, male Lake Huron Grasshoppers attract females by stridulating (producing trills by rubbing the hind leg on the forewing) and conducting display flights while flashing their wings and producing a crackling sound. After mating, females lay clusters of eggs in the sand and the nymphs emerge the following spring. Nymphs pass through five instars before maturing into adults in late July or August. Marram Grass, Tall Wormwood, and Long-leaved Reed Grass are the preferred foods of nymphs and adults. (Updated 2016/12/20)

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Threats

Residential and commercial development and intensive recreational use destroyed or damaged much of the dune habitat, likely causing the extirpation of Lake Huron Grasshopper at historical sites. Recreational use by pedestrians and off-road vehicles significantly reduces subpopulations and continues to threaten some dunes by damaging vegetation and causing dune blowouts (depressions caused by erosion of sand by wind). Invasive plants, especially Common Reed and Spotted Knapweed can replace preferred food plants and alter dune processes. Changes in lake levels related to climate change, natural cycles, or lake level management have the potential to reduce the amount of dune habitat. Some sites have undergone recent improvements under dune stewardship programs. (Updated 2016/12/20)

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Protection

Federal Protection

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

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Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

4 record(s) found.

COSEWIC Status Reports

  • COSEWIC assessment and status report on the Lake Huron Grasshopper Trimerotropis huroniana in Canada (2016)

    Lake Huron Grasshopper is silver-grey to brownish with variable speckles and colours to blend in with its sandy habitat. In flight, the hind wings are exposed to show clear or pale yellow areas at the base, a black band across the middle, and clear or smoky tips. The females (29 to 40 mm) are larger than the males (24 to 30 mm). It is one of a few species endemic to the Laurentian Great Lakes area.

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Lake Huron Grasshopper (2017)

    This globally rare grasshopper is endemic to the Great Lakes region of Ontario, Michigan, and Wisconsin where it is restricted to dunes along the shores of lakes Huron, Michigan, and Superior. In Canada, it is known from 11 dune sites: one location on the east shore of Lake Superior, and seven on Lake Huron at the south shore of Manitoulin Island and Great Duck Island. Formerly, it occurred at three additional sites on Lake Huron but these subpopulations appear to have become extirpated in the 1990s, likely as a result of residential and commercial development combined with intensive recreational use which damaged much of the dune habitat. While recreational use by pedestrians and off-road vehicles continue to threaten some dunes, other sites have undergone recent improvements under dune stewardship programs. Additional threats to dune environments include invasive plants and changes in lake levels related to climate change, natural cycles, or lake level management.

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2015-2016 (2016)

    Over the past year COSEWIC re-examined the status of 25 wildlife species; of these, the majority (68%) were re-assessed at the same or lower level of risk. Of a total of 45 species assessed, seven were assigned a status of Not at Risk (two re-assessments and five new assessments). To date, and with the submission of this report, COSEWIC’s assessments now include 724 wildlife species in various risk categories, including 320 Endangered, 172 Threatened, 209 Special Concern, and 23 Extirpated (i.e., no longer found in the wild in Canada). In addition, 15 wildlife species have been assessed as Extinct, 54 wildlife species have been designated as Data Deficient, and 177 have been assessed and assigned Not at Risk status.

Consultation Documents

  • Consultation on Amending the List of Species under the Species at Risk Act: Terrestrial Species - January 2017 (2017)

    The Government of Canada is committed to preventing the disappearance of wildlife species at risk from our lands. As part of its strategy for realizing that commitment, on June 5, 2003, the Government of Canada proclaimed the Species at Risk Act (SARA). Attached to the Act is Schedule 1, the list of the species provided for under SARA, also called the List of Wildlife Species at Risk. Extirpated, Endangered and Threatened species on Schedule 1 benefit from the protection afforded by the prohibitions and from recovery planning requirements under SARA. Special Concern species benefit from its management planning requirements. Schedule 1 has grown from the original 233 to 521 wildlife species at risk. In 2016, on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment, the Governor in Council approved listing proposals for 44 wildlife species. It is proposed that 23 species be added to Schedule 1, 18 be reclassified or have a change made to how they are defined (two wildlife species are being split into four), one species  be removed from Schedule 1, and another two species not be added. Listing proposals were published in Canada Gazette, part I for a 30-day public comment period and final listing decisions for all 44 species are expected in the first half of 2017.Please submit your comments byMay 11, 2017, for terrestrial species undergoing normal consultationsand byOctober 11, 2017, for terrestrial species undergoing extended consultations.For a description of the consultation paths these species will undergo, please see:Species at Risk Public Registry website The COSEWIC Summaries of Terrestrial Species Eligible for Addition or Reclassification on Schedule 1 - January 2017