Species Profile

Goldencrest

Scientific Name: Lophiola aurea
Other/Previous Names: Golden Crest
Taxonomy Group: Vascular Plants
Range: Nova Scotia
Last COSEWIC Assessment: May 2012
Last COSEWIC Designation: Special Concern
SARA Status: Schedule 1, Special Concern


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Quick Links: | Photo | Description | Distribution and Population | Habitat | Biology | Threats | Protection | Recovery Initiatives | Recovery Team | National Recovery Program | Documents

Image of Goldencrest

Goldencrest Photo 1
Goldencrest Photo 2

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Description

Goldencrest (Lophiola aurea) is a perennial herb within the Bloodwort Family (Haemodoraceae). Plants arise from a rhizome with the erect, linear, blue-green leaves arranged predominantly in basal rosettes. Stems terminate in a single, densely white-woolly, branched inflorescence with yellow flowers that develop into round, many-seeded capsules. Goldencrest is the only member of a distinctive genus and is globally uncommon with a very small range. It co-occurs in southern Nova Scotia with a large suite of other disjunct southern species of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, many of which are rare in Canada, including Redroot and Long’s Bulrush. It is exceptionally disjunct among this suite of species, with Nova Scotia populations separated by 800+ km from the nearest known sites in New Jersey. (Updated 2017/08/30)

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Distribution and Population

Goldencrest is endemic to the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. In the United States, it is known from Louisiana to Georgia, North Carolina, Delaware (where it is extirpated), and New Jersey. In Canada, the nine populations (seven known extant) are restricted to two regions of southern Nova Scotia. (Updated 2017/08/30)

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Habitat

In Canada, Goldencrest occurs on open lakeshores and graminoid-dominated peatlands. Low nutrient, acidic conditions prevail and disturbances such as flooding, wave action and ice scour prevent dominance of more competitive species. Lakeshore substrates are generally peaty, but often with only a thin organic layer over sand, gravel and cobble or bedrock. Elsewhere, the species is found on wet acidic soils in bogs, pocosins (freshwater wetlands with deep sandy and peaty soils), wet savannahs, pine barrens and sometimes in nearby anthropogenically disturbed habitats such as roadside ditches. (Updated 2017/08/30)

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Biology

Goldencrest spreads extensively through rhizome and stolon growth. In Canada, it flowers in August and September. Seed banking is not documented but is plausible given the fluctuating lakeshore habitat in which the species occurs. Seedlings have not been observed in Canada, although little effort has been made to find them. Generation time is estimated at 3-5 years based on field observations suggesting vegetatively derived rosettes likely require several years before being capable of reproducing vegetatively. Individual clones appear very long-lived, potentially on the scale of decades. (Updated 2017/08/30)

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Threats

Shoreline development is the most serious threat to Goldencrest populations. The threat of shoreline development has been mitigated somewhat by the creation of a provincial nature reserve. Other potential future threats are eutrophication, invasive species and peat mining. Historical impacts that are not current threats include water level management through damming of lakes and drainage of peatlands, diatomaceous earth mining, and off-road vehicle disturbance. (Updated 2017/08/30)

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Protection

Federal Protection

More information about SARA, including how it protects individual species, is available in the Species at Risk Act: A Guide.

Provincial and Territorial Protection

To know if this species is protected by provincial or territorial laws, consult the provinces' and territories' websites.

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Recovery Initiatives

Status of Recovery Planning

Recovery Strategies :

Name Recovery Strategy and Management Plan for Multiple Species of Atlantic Coastal Plain Flora in Canada
Status Final posting on SAR registry

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Recovery Team

Atlantic Coastal Plain Flora Recovery Team

  • Sherman Boates - Chair/Contact - Government of Nova Scotia
    Phone: 902-679-6146  Fax: 902-679-6176  Send Email
  • Samara Eaton - Chair/Contact - Environment Canada
    Phone: 506-364-5060  Fax: 506-364-5062  Send Email

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Documents

PLEASE NOTE: Not all COSEWIC reports are currently available on the SARA Public Registry. Most of the reports not yet available are status reports for species assessed by COSEWIC prior to May 2002. Other COSEWIC reports not yet available may include those species assessed as Extinct, Data Deficient or Not at Risk. In the meantime, they are available on request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

10 record(s) found.

COSEWIC Status Reports

  • COSEWIC assessment and status report on the Goldencrest Lophiola aurea in Canada (2013)

    Goldencrest (Lophiola aurea) is a perennial herb within the Bloodwort Family (Haemodoraceae). Plants arise from a rhizome with the erect, linear, blue-green leaves arranged predominantly in basal rosettes. Stems terminate in a single, densely white-woolly, branched inflorescence with yellow flowers that develop into round, many-seeded capsules.

Response Statements

  • Response Statement - Goldencrest (2013)

    In Canada, this Atlantic Coastal Plain plant is found only in Nova Scotia at a few lake shores and wetlands. The Canadian population primarily reproduces vegetatively and is genetically distinct and geographically disjunct from the nearest populations in New Jersey 800 km to the south. Revisions to the COSEWIC assessment criteria since the species’ last assessment account, in part, for the change in its risk status. Recent intensive surveys have also determined that the population is larger than previously thought. However, the species is subject to ongoing threats from development and habitat alteration.

Recovery Strategies

  • Recovery Strategy and Management Plan for Multiple Species of Atlantic Coastal Plain Flora in Canada (2016)

    Section 37 of SARA requires the competent minister to prepare recovery strategies for listed extirpated, endangered or threatened species and Section 65 of SARA requires the competent minister to prepare management plans for special concern species. For the SARA-listed species of Special Concern, their inclusion in this combined recovery strategy and management plan will also serve in lieu of a separate management plan as required under SARA (Sections 65-67). The Province of Nova Scotia, Environment Canada, and Parks Canada Agency led the development of this document. This recovery strategy and management plan was developed in cooperation or consultation with numerous other individuals and agencies including environmental non-government organizations, industry stakeholders, aboriginal groups, and private landowners.

Action Plans

  • Action Plan for Multiple Species of Atlantic Coastal Plain Flora in Canada (2016)

    The Minister of Environment and Climate Change is the competent minister under SARA for the Pink Coreopsis, Thread-leaved Sundew, Water Pennywort, Goldencrest and Plymouth Gentian and has prepared this action plan to implement the recovery strategy, as per section 47 of SARA. The minister responsible for the Parks Canada Agency (PCA) is a competent minister for the Water Pennywort, where the species occurs on lands administered by PCA. To the extent possible, it has been prepared in cooperation with the Province of Nova Scotia, the Atlantic Coastal Plain Flora (ACPF) Recovery Team, environmental non-government organizations, industry stakeholders, aboriginal groups, and private landowners, as per section 48(1) of SARA.

Management Plans

  • Recovery Strategy and Management Plan for Multiple Species of Atlantic Coastal Plain Flora in Canada (2010)

    Section 37 of SARA requires the competent minister to prepare recovery strategies for listed extirpated, endangered or threatened species and Section 65 of SARA requires the competent minister to prepare management plans for special concern species. For the SARA-listed species of Special Concern, their inclusion in this combined recovery strategy and management plan will also serve in lieu of a separate management plan as required under SARA (Sections 65-67). The Province of Nova Scotia, Environment Canada, and Parks Canada Agency led the development of this document. This recovery strategy and management plan was developed in cooperation or consultation with numerous other individuals and agencies including environmental non-government organizations, industry stakeholders, aboriginal groups, and private landowners.

Orders

  • Order Acknowledging Receipt of the Assessments Done Pursuant to Subsection 23(1) of the Act (2016)

    His Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment, acknowledges receipt, on the making of this Order, of assessments conducted under subsection 23(1) of the Species at Risk Act by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) with respect to the species set out in the annexed schedule.
  • Order Amending Schedule 1 to the Species at Risk Act (2017)

    Biodiversity is rapidly declining worldwide as species become extinct. Today’s extinction rate is estimated to be between 1 000 and 10 000 times higher than the natural rate. Biodiversity is positively related to ecosystem productivity, health and resiliency (i.e. the ability of an ecosystem to respond to changes or disturbances), and, given the interdependency of species, a loss of biodiversity can lead to decreases in ecosystem function and services (e.g. natural processes such as pest control, pollination, coastal wave attenuation, temperature regulation and carbon fixing). These services are important to the health of Canadians, and also have important ties to Canada’s economy. Small changes within an ecosystem resulting in the loss of individuals and species can therefore result in adverse, irreversible and broad-ranging effects. List of Wildlife Species at Risk (referral back to COSEWIC) Order

COSEWIC Annual Reports

  • COSEWIC Annual Report - 2011-2012 (2012)

    Under Canada’s Species at Risk Act (SARA), the foremost function of COSEWIC is to “assess the status of each wildlife species considered by COSEWIC to be at risk and, as part of the assessment, identify existing and potential threats to the species”. COSEWIC held two Wildlife Species Assessment Meetings in this reporting year (September 1, 2011 to September 30, 2012) from November 21 to 25, 2011 and from April 29 to May 4, 2012. On February 3, 2012, an Emergency Assessment Subcommittee of COSEWIC also assessed the status of the Tri-colored Bat (Perimyotis subflavus), the Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus), and the Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis). During the current reporting period COSEWIC assessed the status or reviewed the classification of 67 wildlife species. For species already found on Schedule 1 of SARA, the classification of 32 species was reviewed by COSEWIC and the status of the wildlife species was confirmed to be in the same category (extirpated - no longer found in the wild in Canada but occurring elsewhere, endangered, threatened or of special concern). The wildlife species assessment results for the 2011-2012 reporting period include the following: Extinct: 1 Extirpated: 4 Endangered: 29 Threatened: 10 Special Concern: 15 Data Deficient: 2 Not at Risk: 6 Total: 67 Of the 67 wildlife species examined, COSEWIC reviewed the classification of 49 species that had been previously assessed. The review of classification for 26 of those species resulted in a confirmation of the same status as the previous assessment (see Table 1a).

Consultation Documents

  • Consultation on Amending the List of Species under the Species at Risk Act: Terrestrial Species – December 2012 (2013)

    As part of its strategy for protecting wildlife species at risk, the Government of Canada proclaimed the Species at Risk Act (SARA) on June 5, 2003. Attached to the Act is Schedule 1, the list of the species that receive protection under SARA, also called the List of Wildlife Species at Risk. Please submit your comments by March 4, 2013, for terrestrial species undergoing normal consultations and by October 4, 2013, for terrestrial species undergoing extended consultations. Consultation paths.

Residence Description

  • Residence Rationale - Golden Crest (2007)

    Individual Golden Crest plants do not appear to use a dwelling place similar to a nest or den, and therefore do not qualify for having a residence. There would be no additional legal protection not already afforded by protection of the individual and its critical habitat.